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Vyacheslav Rybakov
Vyacheslav Rybakov

Buying A Used Prius



In the end, we suggested she consider getting a used Prius with only 3-4 years on it and the lowest total mileage she can find, which will give her several years of service with no worry about battery life.




buying a used prius



Most people get used to the disconnect between the engine speed (and noise) and the road speed. That's a result of the Hybrid Synergy Drive system constantly adjusting the power it draws from the engine and from the battery pack.


Should you happen to find any truly basic Prius One models sold used by fleets, avoid them--they're missing a LOT of otherwise standard equipment, including cruise control, the EV electric-only mode, and a rear-window wiper.


Prices on used EV have fallen dramatically, and the Tesla Model 3 leads the way. Aptera is the first to use open-source-based Openpilot for driver-assist tech. LG plans a mammoth Arizona plant. And Hyundai previewed the new look of the 2024 Sonata Hybrid. Hyundai has revealed the design of the 2024...


First of all, you should know that there are a ton of used Toyota Prius models in circulation, proving tons of options. However, the Toyota Prius holds its value well with the lowest depreciation value out of all green cars.


When it comes to used Prius cars, third-generation models (2010-2015) are the most popular on the market. For one, the mileage is amazing (Gen 3 Prius cars will give you at least 45 mpg in real-world use), not to mention that it offers a lot in terms of interior and storage space.


Moreover, you need to ask for service and maintenance records not only to check whether the car is worth buying, but also to give you an idea which improvements and repairs you need to carry out after you have purchased the car.


ConclusionThe last thing I would ever want is for someone to be taken for a ride in a car that will destroy them financially. Have questions? Follow me on Twitter @the_hybrid_guy. I am happy to help you wade through the confusing details of buying a used Prius.


I do not know one person on this earth that would ever say, "I am sure glad I got ripped off buying a used car." In fact, I think that it would be quite the opposite. When I bought my Prius I knew what I was getting into. I knew that it had a faulty traction battery, a bad catalytic converter and a few other issues.


Inverter/Converter FailureDue to a manufacturing error in the plant, the converter/inverter has been known to fail on some early Gen 3 models. Typically 2010-2012. The inverter when assembled used a thin film of heat paste that allowed it to be cooled evenly across the electronics inside the unit. The paste on some of the units was not spread on correctly. This would result in a shut down or permanent set trouble codes which would not allow the car to drive normally. Maybe just a short distance to the dealer.


In addition to hybrids being cheaper to operate over time when compared to standard internal combustion engine vehicles, buying used cars can be a great way to garner even more savings. With that in mind, you might ask yourself, should I buy a used Prius?


Carfax Report: In order to avoid any future surprise issues, you should attain a vehicle history report. With it, you can confirm prior maintenance and check if there has ever been an accident reported. This will also help in assessing the fair market value of your particular used Prius is.


Test Drive: Buying any car before having the opportunity to view it in person first is a risky decision that can prove even more problematic when considering purchasing a used car. Make sure that you get an opportunity to test drive the used Prius to confirm its condition and whether or not you even feel comfortable in it.


In the grand scheme of things, almost any used Prius is a reliable pick. However, in comparison to one another, there are years that falter a little. Looking at CarComplaints we can see that the mid to late 2000s is a sore spot for the model.


There are two major complaints about that era of used Prius, the first of which being in regard to lighting. These model years had issues with headlights either burning out or simply refusing to turn on. Another problem with these years is excessive oil consumption.


One thing to watch out for is a recall that occurred for Priuses from 2004 to 2009. These models had insufficiently hard steering column splines that could break and cause steering loss. If looking at a used Prius from those model years, make sure its steering column was checked.


The fuel economy bumps from the third to fourth generation are quite noticeable. Looking at fuelly, the third generation hovers in the mid-40 mpg range, while the fourth-generation models are able to breach past the 50 mpg mark. If great fuel economy is the be-all and end-all, then a used Prius from 2016 onwards is best for you.


When you shop for a new or used car, CoPilot helps you know more. We search every car at every dealer so you don't have to, we give you data and insights you won't find anywhere else, and we rank every car so it's easy to find the best car at the best price.


Beginning January 1, 2023, if you buy a qualified used electric vehicle (EV) or fuel cell vehicle (FCV) from a licensed dealer for $25,000 or less, you may be eligible for a used clean vehicle tax credit (also referred to as a previously owned clean vehicle credit). The credit equals 30% percent of the sale price up to a maximum credit of $4,000.


You may qualify for a credit for buying a previously owned, qualified plug-in electric vehicle (EV) or fuel cell vehicle (FCV), including cars and light trucks, under Internal Revenue Code Section 25E.


Complete Form 8936, Qualified Plug-in Electric Drive Motor Vehicle Credit (Including Qualified Two-Wheeled Plug-in Electric Vehicles and New Clean Vehicles), and file it with your tax return for the year you took possession of the vehicle to claim the used clean vehicle credit. You will need to include the vehicle identification number (VIN) on the form.


Buying a used Toyota Prius is not for the faint of heart. The Prius has been on the market since 2001, and there are now many different models to choose from. To help you get started, keep these 5 things in mind before buying a used Toyota Prius.


Some makes/models could be too old to drive on public roads. For example, it is highly recommended not to purchase first-generation Prius cars (released 2000-2003) as they likely have high mileage today. Second-gen Prius cars (release 2004-2009) are also known for several weak spots and multiple recalls. Like any major purchase, do your research on any pre-owned vehicle before driving it away from the used car dealership lot.


A used Toyota Prius needs an oil change every 3 months or 10,000 miles (whichever comes first) using only special oils approved by the manufacturer. Otherwise, this expensive little engine will likely stop working once the warranty expires. Although many of these cars are driven for several years before needing extensive repairs like this, it will be difficult to pinpoint the exact date and cause of failure.


If you are looking for a used car, do not let anyone convince you to buy from any online discussion forum. Scammers often use these sites to target innocent victims with fraudulent advertising scams that sound too good to be true. Getting a pre-inspection service from a reliable Prius auto shop in Chandler, AZ, is a great way to weed out potential scams and lemons.


For example, the hybrid battery pack requires complete submersion in special water baths during recharging cycles. Unless you have access to this type of equipment, there is little reason for you to purchase a used model instead of a certified pre-owned one. This is not to say that you cannot save money by buying a used Prius. Just be sure to bring your car in for its regularly scheduled maintenance services at an affordable rate.


While the pros outweigh the cons of buying a used hybrid car, the buyer should be aware of a few peculiarities. These features make shopping for a hybrid somewhat different than shopping for a traditional internal combustion engine vehicle. Making a sound investment will depend on taking some precautions before making a purchase.


Maintenance History: Request a detailed vehicle history and maintenance report or track its history through a service like AutoCheck or Carfax. Although this is good advice for purchasing any used vehicle, it is especially important for a hybrid. Twice as complex as gas-powered cars, a hybrid is equipped with two engines. Maintenance procedures are more rigorous than those of traditional, gas-only vehicles. For hybrid components and electrical systems to function properly, they require regular maintenance and servicing. They often use specialized engine oil.


In 2020, US News ranked the best 100 used hybrid cars on the market under $20,000. The high number of cars alone suggests that a buyer searching for a reliable used hybrid has a more than adequate number of options.


While my current car (Ford Mondeo) was being fixed, I hired a Prius for a couple of days and I really liked it. As my car is on the verge of collapse I have been looking to buy a used Pruis. However, for some reason, everyone I talk to it about tells me I'm making a big mistake and I should just get a "proper" car, the Battery will fail and it will cost thousands etc etc. I have replied that buying any used car is a gamble and the big end could go or something of similar seriousness but I just wondered if any of you could share your experiences of buying a used Prius. Are you pleased you did and would you do it again? Have any of you had Battery issues that have cost you thousands? I don't know anybody else with a Prius so if you could share your experiences with me I'd really appreciate it.


While my current car (Ford Mondeo) was being fixed, I hired a Prius for a couple of days and I really liked it. As my car is on the verge of collapse I have been looking to buy a used Pruis. However, for some reason, everyone I talk to it about tells me I'm making a big mistake and I should just get a "proper" car, the battery will fail and it will cost thousands etc etc. I have replied that buying any used car is a gamble and the big end could go or something of similar seriousness but I just wondered if any of you could share your experiences of buying a used Prius. Are you pleased you did and would you do it again? Have any of you had battery issues that have cost you thousands? I don't know anybody else with a Prius so if you could share your experiences with me I'd really appreciate it. 041b061a72


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